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December 14, 2010 / jasonpinto

Recognizing When We Have Heavy Ankles

It’s been on my bookshelf for quite a while, but I’ve finally started reading David Halberstam’s book, “The Education of a Coach“.

The book spends a lot of time discussing how talented Steve Belichick was when it came to scouting. My favorite passage involved how he could tell if someone was going to be fast enough to succeed at a speed position in football. He didn’t need to look at his stopwatch. Rather, he could tell if you were fast by looking at your ankles. If you had “heavy ankles”, then you probably would not be a good fit to play receiver — you might be better suited for the offensive line.

The Field of Marketing

How good are we when it comes to analyzing our situation?

When it comes to marketing, there are a number of items that we should be looking at on a regular basis. This might include analyzing how talented we are when it comes to certain skills (writing, designing, managing, editing, etc…). It might also include analyzing if we have the right tools in place — whether it’s hardware or software.

When we find answers to these questions, we must be willing to be honest with ourselves and others.

Knowing When Something Won’t Work

In today’s economy, we all may feel pressure to be superb at everything that we do — and to be just as good at the things that we are not yet prepared to be good at.

In football, a wide receiver with heavy ankles will have a very hard time finding success. Hopefully, a scout or coach recognizes this before he can fail, and puts him in a position that’s better suited to his strengths.

In business, we would be wise to look to others for candid opinions of our talents. But oftentimes, we need to do the analysis ourselves. If we can honestly search for and acknowledge our findings, then we will find ourselves in positions that may lead to success.

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